Monday, January 4, 2010

Goatucation: Actually Chickucation - The Rhode Island Red

It's Monday so you know what that means - it's time for Goatucation! 
But not today. Today I am going to do another Chickucation. I like to shake things up around this Farm. I will tell you all about the chickens on this Farm; the Rhode Island Red. (I will tell you about Blue Guy next week - he is the odd rooster out.)

The male person picked the Rhode Island Red mostly because the breed he really wanted (the publicist doesn't remember the name of it) produced medium sized eggs. When the publicist heard this she looked at the male person like he was crazy and said how to you expect me to bake anything around this Farm with medium sized eggs you fool I need large eggs, duh kindly told the male person she needed large eggs for baking so he went back to his research and chose the Rhode Island Red. Isn't he nice to the publicist? He also chose them because they are a very hardy breed of chicken and he knew they would be able to withstand Montana's cold winters. 


They are also very good at free ranging; just ask the horses across the street.


The Rhode Island Red was developed in, well, Rhode Island as a dual purpose bird. That means they are good for both laying eggs and for their meat. 
The rooster



 can get to 8 1/2 pound and get to be a little  
A LITTLE?!  
A LITTLE?!   
aggressive. 
The hen



is usually around 6 1/2 pounds. They are much nicer to the publicist. You will note from the comments above that she has some problems with the roosters. Heh heh.

The Reds lay brown eggs. 
This is a very interesting chicken fact; chickens with red/brown feathers lay brown eggs. Chickens with white feathers lay white eggs.

There - you have been Chickucated! 

Tomorrow: The does get their pine

I have just come to realize that January 5th will be my 1 year Blogoversary. I am very happy about this and will be planning something special for all of my wonderful readers. 


 

20 comments:

  1. I had no idea that there was a link between the feather color and the egg color! That rooster weighs more than me.

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  2. Except in the case of Aracaunas and Americanas, then you know they will lay the pastel colored eggs by the dark coloring on their legs.
    I have Rhode Island Reds too, they are wonderful producers with many large often double yoked eggs. I have been baffled by my Roosters formerly who were very amicable suddenly deciding to fight constantly, often drawing blood. It's really upsetting the peaceful vibe we had going around the homestead. Wonder which one will get restricted to the barn today.

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  3. They're really pretty birds and dual purpose? That's kinda cool!

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  4. Rhode Island Reds...This was my Grandmother's favorite kind of bird!

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  5. I can totally relate to the publicist. All recipes call for large eggs and it is a pain in the neck to try to substitute. The fresh eggs make amazing pasta. Does the publicist make pasta? I wouldn't be surprised if she did, she makes everything else.

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  6. I always have a problem with the roosters, too! One hit me SO hard on the shins with his spurs it left a huge goose egg and bruise that lasted for days. I started carrying a leaf/lawn rake with me around them. I love the brown eggs - which ones lay the green eggs? Would that be the black chickens? Great Chickucation today!

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  7. Very informative Pricilla -- thank you!

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  8. I always wondered how the egg color was developed. Happy Blogoversary! Only a year? It seems like I have known you for much longer. My how time flies. Congrats!

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  9. We have the leghorns, they lay large white eggs (white feathers) I did not know the feather color dictated the egg color!

    No Roosters here.

    We were free ranging but after loosing more chickens than I can count to predators, ours have to stay in their coop. 10x20 pen ... only 2 chickens but soon to be 3 ...decided we could use more.

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  10. No freakin way? Why don't they teach that color-coded egg lesson in school?

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  11. So the theory that black cows make chocolate milk is true too?? Wow.

    Your one year anniversary??! How come I feel like we've been friends longer than that?? :)

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  12. i started blogging just after you. i was just wondering today about what made me start blogging. i have no idea? but i certainly found you early on! happy almost one year anniversary! i sooo love my daily blog mates! i had no idea the feathers had anything to do with egg colors. cool!

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  13. Great lesson today Pricilla! Tell the publicist I am impressed with her retraint in dealing with male person's lack of egg-size understanding ....although male person seems to know A LOT about other things so restraint was probably well-founded.

    Keep warm sweet goat ....

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  14. Hi from SITS! I wish I lived where we could have chickens . . .

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  15. This was very interesting! We didn't know that certain chickens make certain size eggs - we just though they lay various sizes!

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  16. I didn't know about the feather and egg fact! That is actually very interesting. The publicist seems like a very crazy -- oops, um... -- super nice person to the male person!

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  17. OK, I'd heard about the color of the eggs, but I'd not heard that specific chicken lay specific-SIZED eggs. Thanks for the chickucation!

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  18. We used to have colored hens that laid white eggs so maybe the color to color ratio does not always apply. But on to roosters... I think I need to teach the publicist how to punt her rooster. That way he will avoid her when he sees her. Hee hee. ;)

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Maaaaaa away....

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